Sunday, September 25, 2011

borrowed voices



Things change. It is foolish to expect consistency; from people, jobs, family, life. I know this now but I'm still naive and perhaps holding out on one friend, person, stranger, who will tell me that there are exceptions. That there is someone you can always count on no matter what and that person will not waiver. Their motives will never be questionable, and they will always be true, to themselves and to you.

But that's like believing in Santa Clause. We all have wants and desires. I believe at the core of all this is the want and need for love. We act out, stupidly, meticulously, meditatively to gain it, sometimes in round-about ways, sometimes at the expense and pain of others, seek it in material and base things. The cruelest ones are the ones who feign obliviousness, because they act out in hurtful ways and won't tell us the real reasons why.

C.S. Lewis' Till We Have Faces. It's quite lovely and I have always found Greek mythology enchanting. The title drew me in, and it was the author's intention. {spoiler alert} The title came from this quote at the end of the book: "How can [the gods] meet us face to face till we have faces?"

He defended his choice of title by describing the novel's importance to the human condition in a letter to Dorothea Conybeare, explaining that the idea behind the title was that a human being must become real before it can expect to receive any message from divine beings; "that is, it must be speaking with its own voice (not one of its borrowed voices), expressing its actual desires (not what it imagines that it desires), being for good or ill itself, not any mask."
- via







1 comment:

Kacrates said...

wow very enlightening! Greek mythology is very interesting though and the philosophical messages.

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